Seriously Creeped Out

Fishing Spider

This is NOT what I wanted to see on my studio window screen this morning!  The window was open, but at first glance I couldn’t tell whether this way-too-big-to-be-comfortable-with-it spider was on the inside of my studio, or outside, where it belonged.  Closer – albeit careful – inspection revealed it to be clinging to the outside of the window screen, so that was permissible.

Admittedly, spiders are not among my favorite forms of wildlife.  I do try to capture and release indoor trespassers before I resort to squashing or vacuuming, though that thought always crosses my mind.   Spiders that are outside my buildings are in their own habitat and  I respect that, and their right to be there.  It’s only the ones that come indoors that I have issues with.

Anyway, this one is called a fishing spider.  I’m not sure what he’s fishing for on my screen, but they do like trees and woods and there’s plenty of both here.  In fact, my guess is that it came off, or was heading for, the shagbark hickory that is only inches from the window.

As spiders go…a beauty, I suppose.  Though I think there should be a size-limit on spiders.  Things like insects and spiders tend to get creepier as they get larger.

 

Mystery Shroom


I came across this mystery mushroom in the woods next to our house.  I’ve never seen anything like it and after several hours of perusing my mushroom field guides – still haven’t seen anything like it.

There were four or five of these growing in the wet leaf litter.  I have no idea at what stage they are either, but it does seem to me that they aren’t as fresh as they could be.  Did that change their shape so much that I can’t find what species they are in the guide books?

Each one is about 3 inches tall.  Anyone have any ideas?

Notice the bug on this one!

Bearly There (sorry)

 NJ Black Bear – photo by Rob Socha

A few ‘bear aware’ flyers and posters are beginning to appear around town – especially in sporting goods stores or places that sell feed. A bear population in KY is a relatively new thing – which seems rather odd considering the amount of bear habitat here. But the bears have been gone since around 1900.  The wooded habitat was severely logged, and the bears hunted without laws or limits.

The forest habitats have largely recovered from excessive logging, and black bears are now finding their way into eastern Kentucky from Virginia and West Virginia, and in southern KY, from Tennessee. We’re sort of between the two, in south-central KY very close to Tennessee in the Daniel Boone National Forest, and only 20 miles from the Big South Fork Recreation Area.  Plenty of prime bear habitat – but we have heard of only one or two sightings.  I can’t believe that there are no bears here, so I’m thinking the lack of sightings may be due to the fact that, unlike overpopulated New Jersey (a few old posts  here and here) the bears in KY simply have plenty of open space and don’t venture near or stay around people long enough to be seen.

The current bear situation in KY reminds me of NJ when I was a kid in the 60s.  I’m sure there were a few around, but we never, ever saw them. I saw my first bear in NJ in the mid 80s, only because I was with the bear biologist and we were tracking a radio-collared female. Come to think of it, we never did actually see her – she kept moving away whenever we got close.

According to the Fish and Wildlife authorities here, the number of bears in KY is unknown.  There are enough, however, in three eastern counties that there’s going to be a short bear hunting season this December. Of course there is.  I won’t say any more about that….

For now, having come from NJ where bears are commonplace, I’m enjoying not having to worry about them being in my face.  But the truth is, I miss seeing them.  Surely, they belong in woods as vast as these, and I’m certain they are out there. I”m hoping we can continue to enjoy this natural balance, where they remain wild and in the woods instead of parked in my yard.

I have all this new-found freedom!  I can hike here and be outside without constantly watching for bear. I can put up my bird feeders and suet without imposed restrictions from the authorities. I can leave my birdfeeders out overnight. Still can’t leave the trash, but that’s due to coyotes, feral cats, raccoons, opossums, neighborhood dogs, and other mysterious nighttime critters.

So far, my suet and bird feeders have been molested only once by raccoons.  I’ve hung them out-of-reach on a wire line now, so the raccoons will have to scrounge for leftovers on the ground. When my hanging suet and sunflower feeders disappear, and when I find my cross wire ripped out of the poles and on the ground, I’ll know there’s been a bear in the yard.  Or maybe Bigfoot.  Cain’t never tell around here….

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